Septic Inspections St. Charles


Septic Stryker

We are Missouri state licensed to inspect and or evaluate any private septic system in the state of Missouri.

A septic inspection is required in some counties before a real estate transaction can close. Typically the home owner pays for the septic inspection for his property (not the buyer).

A septic evaluation is used by some loan institutions to give a general overview of the septic system.

An inspection is more in depth and all components of the system are located and visibly inspected.

We are Missouri state licensed to inspect and or evaluate any private septic system in the state of Missouri. A septic inspection is required in some counties before a real estate transaction can close. Typically the home owner pays for the septic inspection for his property (not the buyer). A septic evaluation is used by some loan institutions to give a general overview of the septic system. An inspection is more in depth and all components of the system are located and visibly inspected.

  • Finished reports usually available the same day
  • Average report is about 10 pages
  • Reports are archived for future use at the county and state level – at no additional charge
  • Certified in use of tracer dye – and if needed – no additional charge
  • Free instruction regarding care and maintenance of each septic system

Septic inspections include:

  • Determining type & age of system
  • Functionality of the mechanical components
  • Functionality of the treatment / dispersal (field) system
  • Size and capacity of the tanks and pumping systems
  • Site sketch of system
  • Research system history
  • Tank lid exposed and the need for clean out determined with use of sludge judge
  • Pumping / dosing components inspected
  • Aerated treatment units inspected
  • Septic tanks inspected
  • Lagoons inspected
  • Holding Tanks inspected
  • Pump / processing tank inspected
  • Bio Filters: Sand, Pete, Textile, Foam and other select media inspected
  • Dispersal Systems including: Conventional Field, Low Pressure Pipe, Drip Irrigation, Mounds and At Grade Systems
  • Set back distances determined during inspection

Highlights of MO Department of Health Rules Changes for Onsite Residential Sewer Inspections
Effective January 01, 2009

  1. If a residence has a private well and an onsite sewer inspection is performed, then a well inspection is required and vice versa.
  2. The language referring to septic drain fields, “Do not perform hydraulic load test on homes vacant more than 60 days” is reiterated and better defined. There is an expectation to the rule that states an alternate dye test may be performed on homes vacant for more than 60 days only when … “the house is situated on a lot with limited setback distances and is adjacent to a lake or stream”.
  3. All sewer systems will be inspected to current standards. This means no more grandfathering of old systems and/or systems on at least three acres. Since the onsite inspector is not a regulator, he/she will not require repairs, but will notify the parties in a real estate transaction as well as the state/ local regulatory authorities of any defects. However, the state and/or local authority can take action if the sewer system is found in violation of a State code due to a defect if a complaint is received by an “aggrieved party or adjacent homeowner” that the system presents a nuisance and/or endangers health.

Newly added State defined deficiencies:

  • The septic tank and/or all of its components are not visible. In this case, the inspector should recommend the pumping of the tank for complete observation. (A second trip by the inspector to the property may be necessary.)
  • There are no inspection ports above inlet and outlet of septic tank.
  • Manhole access on a septic tank is more than 18 inches below ground level.
  • Open discharge of sewage (even if the sewer system was grandfathered-in before because of age or because the system is on at least three acres).
  • If a waste line including gray water is not piped to the septic tank. An expectation would be a water softener.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.